Article Summary

Once you have made the choice to quit your job, (besides giving notice to your boss and writing a resignation letter), there are things to consider doing to ensure a graceful transition before heading out the office doors for the last time. In today's article we share a list of things to consider before quitting your job.

Things To Do Before Quitting Your Job

Once you have made the choice to quit your job, (besides giving notice to your boss and writing a resignation letter), there are things to consider doing to ensure a graceful transition before heading out the office doors for the last time.

In today's article we share a list of things to consider before quitting your job. 

1.- Have a Plan.


When you’re excited about your next job, planning an exit process may seem pointless, but if you want to make sure that you are able to get everything done before you leave and end your relationship on a high note, putting together a transition plan is crucial. It doesn’t have to be too elaborate, but it must include some basic information such as: knowing who will take charge of your projects and tasks moving forward; having dates set to transition these items to their new owner(s); and creating a list of tasks you need to complete before you leave.

2.- Take what’s yours.


You should save any important files, emails or documents that you might need in the future, and make sure to do it before you tell anyone that you are leaving. It doesn’t matter how good an employee you are or how good your relationship is with your boss, some companies may choose to terminate your employment upon receiving news of your intention to quit. 

In such cases, some cash compensation is usually offered in lieu of working an additional two weeks. If you’ve not used up all of your vacation entitlement, these are also often paid to you. Keep in mind that employment laws vary depending on where you reside. Be sure to know your  rights before you announce your departure.


3. Figure out your health insurance coverage.


It might sound boring and believe me, IT CAN BE, but it is important that you know what your health insurance options will be before your official exit date. Not all the companies have the same policies about coverage, so it is important for you to know what type of coverage you are entitled to, if any.


4. Update your Resume and LinkedIn Profile.


Remember to keep your resume and linkedIn profile up to date so you can start your new job search as quickly as possible. It is easier to update this information before you leave, as the details are still fresh in your mind. 

In some cases, it may be wise to make such changes only after you’ve given notice, otherwise rumours may spread and create a more complex situation for you to deal with.


5. Reorganize your budget.


Another important thing to do before you announce your resignation is to get your finances in order. Unless you have a new job already lined-up, you cannot be certain how long you will be unemployed. 

It is sensible to build up a financial cushion while you are still working in order to  be able to cover your expenses and debts after you leave. A general rule of thumb is to have the equivalent of 6-12 months worth of earnings in an emergency fund. Life is unpredictable. Don’t assume that you’ll be able to find suitable new employment overnight.


6. Stay humble.

Although your colleagues are likely to be curious about your plans and will likely want to know if you already have a new job, don’t get carried away by the temptation of bragging about scoring a better or higher paying gig. There is nothing wrong with expressing some of your happiness with your coworkers about the opportunity life has presented you, but it is important to not overdo it.


7. Say thank you.


Take your time to thank everyone who has been instrumental in helping you to advance your career. This gesture will be remembered fondly by your co-workers for a very long time.

It  is important to note that many workers end up “boomeranging” back into the workplace of a former employer. Sometimes a short-term change is sufficient to get you excited about returning to work in a familiar environment with people you enjoyed working with. 

Leaving on good terms is not only a sign of professionalism, it is a smart career move.

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