Article Summary

Lying on your resume can be tempting when you really want to get the position, but in the long term it could be a very bad idea. When you are searching for a job and you finally find one that you actually want, but it turns out that there are some requirements in that position that you don’t meet, it is only natural to be tempted to stretch the truth and claim that you have more skills or greater experience than you really have.

4 Reasons Not To Lie On Your Resume

Lying on your resume can be tempting when you really want to get the position, but in the long term it could be a very bad idea. When you are searching for a job and you finally find one that you actually want, but it turns out that there are some requirements in that position that you don’t meet, it is only natural to be tempted to stretch the truth and claim that you have more skills or greater experience than you really have. 

In today's article we present reasons why you shouldn’t lie in your resume.


1.- They might do some research on you


In this digital age it is really easy for an employer to go online to check you out through social media. Some recruiters will go as far as to get in touch with your contacts in order to ask them if what you are claiming is true. If reality doesn’t align with the content of your resume, you won’t be considered for an interview.


2.- You might get the job, but you won’t likely be able to do it


When an employer makes the decision to hire you, it is because you have convinced them that you have the right qualifications and abilities to perform in the role. If once you start working you are not getting the results they are expecting, your employer will soon realize you have misrepresented yourself and you could be fired. If your firing is justified, it could have serious consequences, as you may not be eligible to collect employment insurance benefits.  


3.- A constant fear of discovery


Once you tell a lie, there will always be the possibility of someone finding out the truth. So before you decide to exaggerate, ask yourself if you are willing to be living in constant fear of that happening. Will your fibs be detected during the job interview, on your first day at work, during the progression of your career? Trying to gain a short-term advantage could end up haunting you about being “discovered” for years. 


4.- It can damage your reputation and future career opportunities


“Six degrees of separation” applies in the workplace as much as it does in the rest of your life. An industry can seem vast, but you’d be surprised how word gets around when a worker acquires a bad reputation.

If you get caught lying, regardless of whether that is during a job interview or once you’ve been  hired, you will not only have to deal with the stress and strain of being unemployed and looking for a new job, you will also be on edge wondering if the next person you meet already knows  that you have a history of twisting the truth. Taken to the extreme, this could affect your ability to gain employment within your industry or area of expertise.

In the end, it is always best to represent yourself factually. As with the start of every relationship, all parties want to begin a collaboration without assuming the worst of anyone. 

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